PROGRAM PROGRESS

HOW IT WORKS:

Simply click on the day of the program to begin, and make sure you mark off each day as you go!

Notes: How do the "weeks" work? For instance, Week 1, if you started the program on a Monday, that would be Day 1. Day 6 would be Saturday. Week 2 would begin on Monday of the following week.

How to See Exercise Demos

PHASE I - General Physical Preparation (GPP)

It is now time to embark on your personal journey to walking the sky! The first phase of the BoingVERT Jump System program is designed to enable the athlete to adapt to demands that he/she will be placed under during the progressions of the phases to come. In addition, the exercises and their execution will strive to improve upon overall stabilization of all musculature important in jump-specific tasks, change muscle imbalances and dysfunctions, add to proprioception, and gain general strength qualities. Many athletes will initially see the exercises and corresponding variables involved in this phase and feel as though they can jump ahead without completing this 3-week phase. However, this phase is crucial for both the beginner and the experienced athlete alike. Quite frankly, this phase will prepare the athlete for the more intense periods to come and begin to lay the foundation for achieving both biomechanical and neuromuscular efficiency during the Jump Mastery 2nd Phase.

Phase Duration: 3 weeks
Frequency: The workouts in this phase are designed to be completed 3 times/week with at least a day of rest in between those training sessions. On these off days, additional core work is to be completed as shown below.

Additional Notes: Even if you are tempted to jump ahead, we would implore you to have the patience to see this phase through. Some athletes who may be at higher levels of Jump Mastery may be able to get away with bypassing this phase, but it is important to occasionally revisit this type of training protocol in order to create optimum levels of stabilization, flexibility, and postural control.

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WEEK 2

WEEK 3

PHASE II - Jump Mastery

The second phase of the BoingVERT Jump System has a very important purpose: to help each and every athlete self-optimize their jumping movement pattern (referred to as Jump Mastery). Research and analysis has shown us that jump performance is going to be drastically affected by the ability to produce maximal levels of force at the appropriate instant in time during jump-specific tasks. This will take place through the proper interaction between agonist and synergistic muscle groups coupling force in a correct sequencing pattern and allowing for an inhibition/relaxation of the antagonistic muscle groups that could often hamper speed of movement and the ultimate jump performance. The problem is, like with the development of expertise in anything that you can possibly imagine (such as playing the piano, being a cook, public-speaking, etc), perfection is the ultimate goal and this takes a very deliberate focus and intent on continual improvement. Jump Mastery is no-different. Any jump performance training program should include periods of time where the emphasis is placed solely on the attainment of more optimal jump movement patterns.

Phase Duration: 2 weeks
Frequency: The work-outs in this phase of the BoingVERT Jump System are meant to be completed on 4 days of each week of the cycle. This means that you will complete 8 total Jump Mastery training sessions. You may structure the work-outs on whichever days of the week that you like however a Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday scenario seems to work well for many trainees to allow for ample rest time. In addition, the lower leg protocol volume will be decreased down to an every other day protocol until Phase 4 (when it will be done each day again). Finally, no additional core work will be done until Phase 4, as well.

Additional Notes:
For many athletes, this phase is going to be the most important out of all of those that they will complete during the program. No matter where one’s level of mastery currently resides, movement optimization is an on-going process that needs to have close attention paid to it. Remember, perfect practice makes perfect. This is your chance to optimize your movement patterns to be perfect for you and your strengths. The working effect of a movement (i.e. how your body is dealing with the forces at play) is constantly changing and the key to the transfer of any gains in physical qualities in the rest of the program may lie in the improvement of this Jump Mastery (both in this phase and in the last phase).

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WEEK 2

PHASE III - Force Absorption

The third phase of the BoingVERT Jump System will focus on some key components to jumping higher and moving faster: the ability to absorb and rapidly stabilize greater amounts of force. This is an idea that is too often overlooked as many training protocols focus on the taking-off portion of movements (the concentric action) rather than emphasizing the ability to take in greater amounts of force. However, it can be said that the how well we take-off will actually be determined by how well we land, plant, and absorb forces. In fact, one of the greatest sport scientists in the history of our industry, Yuri Verkhoshansky, was one of the first to realize this all-important concept. Verkhoshansky was a Soviet scientist and jump coach who realized those athletes who were his greatest jumpers were also the athletes who possessed the greatest amounts of eccentric strength/ability as well as quicker ground contact times. He also realized through his research that heavy strength training was not the answer to the attainment of greater jumping performances. This led him to develop the use of a number of exercises that emphasized the eccentric actions which corresponded directly to jumping tasks. These exercises are still some of our most powerful tools in the attainment of greater jump performances. These exercises are now termed by many as plyometrics but they (specifically a great few that are used extensively during the course of the BoingVERT Jump System) were keys to the success realized by most Russian sports training protocols that ended up being some dominant for decades. Fortunately, the phase present here in the BoingVERT Jump System will present a similar training protocol to those used were used for the phenomenal physical preparation plans in the Soviet Union.

Phase Duration: 3 weeks
Frequency: The work-outs in the Absorption Phase of the BoingVERT Jump System were designed to be done 3 days each week. The lower leg protocol/BoingDESK WORKOUT will be completed on an every other day schedule.

Additional Notes: Landing is paramount to the success of not only this phase of the system but also to your long-term success as a jump athlete. Thus, as already stated, it’s important for you to always strive for landing perfection. This is of even greater important during this phase because you will be required to absorb forces that present a supramaximal challenge to your body (i.e. loads that it has rarely experienced in the past). The rest periods during this phase are much longer than in other phases. However, this is for a reason: force absorption protocols are much more taxing to the nervous system than many other training modalities. To compound this then, the nervous system requires 3 to 4 times the duration of time to recover than the muscular system does.

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WEEK 2

WEEK 3

PHASE IV - Rate of Force Development/Jump Acceleration

The fourth phase of the BoingVERT Jump System was designed to focus on taking advantage of the new movement efficiencies and unique physical characteristics attained during the first three phases. Each exercise and work-out in this phase is designed to increase the athlete’s jumping acceleration through an increase in rate of force development and a continual emphasis on velocity of contraction of synergist muscle groups in an optimal force-coupling pattern.
Phase Duration: 3 weeks
Frequency: Phase 4 of the BoingVERT Jump System is meant to be completed 3 times per week with at least a day in between training sessions. On these off days, you will also be required to complete the below core work-outs and you will also be expected to increase the use of the lower leg protocol to an everyday basis at this point during the 3 weeks of this Phase (for Phases 5 and 6 it will be on an every other day basis again).

Additional Notes: The importance of triple extension mechanics during each exercise in this phase (unless otherwise noted) cannot go overstated as any protocol developed to increase movement velocity must still do so while incorporating mechanics that are specific to the nature of the ultimate task specific to our goal (in this case; jumping high!). To go hand-in- hand with this idea, in order to attain the highest possible movement speeds, the athlete needs to focus on the rapid display of force from the beginning of the execution of the rep all the way through the duration of the push-off/concentric movement action.

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WEEK 2

WEEK 3

PHASE V - Reactive Emphasis

The purpose of the fifth phase of the BoingVERT Jump System is to increase the overall reactive strength capabilities of the athlete. This reactive strength is much different than reaction time so do not think of it this way. Essentially, think of reactive strength as the body’s ability to adequately start, stop, and change direction in jumping movements. The exercises selected in this phase will allow require a significant use and overload of the stretch-shortening cycle. All movements must be completed at maximum velocities and emphasis on brief ground contact times.

Phase Duration: 3 weeks
Frequency: The 5th phase of the BoingVERT Jump System reduces frequency from 3 times per week down to 2 times per week. The reason for this is because the exercise selections in this phase are on the extreme end of the plyometric intensity spectrum. Thus, additional days are not needed AND extra volume of any kind is not advised. Your body will need all of its current adaptation reserves in order to recover from each of the work-outs in this phase of the system.

Additional Notes: To determine the optimal heights for the application of the Depth Jump exercise, you will actually perform a brief testing session of various heights on the first day of this phase. It is very important that you stick to the heights that you found to be specific for your own individuality. This testing session will consist of performing a set of depth jump with vertical take-off (after you have performed your warm-up/movement preparation and hip work) while measuring the heights attained in the jump upward after landing. Start at 12 inches and go up 2 to 3 inches with every passing repetition of jumps (allow yourself 30-45 seconds between test repetitions) until you are no longer reaching a jump height greater than that of the repetition before. Record the heights. The box height that represents the highest corresponding jump value will be the box that you utilize for your ‘high-box’ loads shown in the NOTES section on each of the work-outs. The ‘low-box’ load will be half of this value. Thus, if you reached your highest jump value when dropping from a box of 28 inches, you will designate that box as your ‘high-box’ for each of the work- outs and your ‘low-box’ prescription will be 14 inches (i.e. half of the high-box #). You will stay at this height all the way through (i.e. for all 3 weeks). Do not increase the box height with each passing week! The higher box height will present significant overload for the use of maximal explosive jump effort whereas the lower box will be used to adequately develop the reactive capacities of the body.

That all said, if you did not achieve a vertical jump performance from any height of box than that which was greater than your initial countermovement vertical jump testing on the pre-testing session, then you are still not ready to perform the Depth Jump exercise in training yet. Instead, you would be better served to perform another Absorption-focused training phase (identical to Phase 3) until you build up the eccentric/force absorption capabilities needed to dynamically stabilize force in the most rapid possible fashion. Until this happens, the Depth Jumps would not serve their necessary purpose of improving upon jumping reactive ability. This concept is one that many people often neglect at the sacrifice of improved performance. Do not allow your ego to get in the way with this. If you are not currently ready to move onto Depth Jumps, you are not alone. In fact, many individuals will have to go through several Force Absorption Phases before they possess the adequate levels of eccentric strength to perform more extreme shock plyometric movements effectively.

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WEEK 3

PHASE VI - Jump Mastery

The sixth and final phase of the BoingVERT Jump System is very similar to Phase 2 in that it demands the majority of its focus on optimizing technique and efficiency. This phase will be the culmination of the proper progression taken during the first five phases. At this point, we are looking to help your body to apply the new-found physical qualities from the first five phases of the system. Don’t be surprised if the movement patterns feel slightly different than they did when you performed them in Phase 2. This is normal due to the increase in force absorption, rate of force development/jump acceleration, and reactive strength. After two weeks of this Jump Mastery training, your technique and coordination will start to become much more fluid and natural again while you are reaching heights that you never dreamed possible.

Phase Duration: 2 weeks
Frequency: The 6th phase of the BoingVERT Jump System will go back to a 4 day/week plan as this phase attempts to maximize your specific jumping potential. Again, like during Phase 2, you can choose any 4 days that you wish during the week to complete the training sessions but it is usually not in an athlete’s best interest to do 4 sessions on consecutive days.

Additional Notes: The main difference between Phase 2 and Phase 6 is that this phase will revolve around a concept we will refer to as autoregulation. In a nutshell, what this means is that we will use a quantitative performance measure to determine how much you should do in regards to repetitions and overall volume. This use of autoregulation will ensure that we are always performing repetitions that will allow us to train with the highest of power production qualities and movement efficiencies. If either of these begins to drop at any point in the training session, the sets for that exercise will be stopped immediately because we know that further repetitions in this suboptimal state will only cause the movement pattern to change in a negative fashion and compensations will begin to take place. That said you should measure your jump height or distance with all of the exercises. Test and record the first 3 repetitions that take place after the movement preparation and warm-up reps have been completed. Now multiply the best one of those 3 reps by 0.9 (which will represent 90% optimization). This value will give you the number that you must stay above to continue to perform the prescribed repetitions. You must fight the urge to continue to perform reps if you are not reaching values of 90% or higher. Also, do not feel as though it is a failure if you are unable to complete all of the prescribed repetitions. This is simply our way of attaining feedback to ensure optimal performance is taking place and you are taking steps forward in your progress. If you have any questions, please email us at BoingVERT@gmail.com.

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